Celebrating Women’s History Month with Stache’ Smith

This month, we are celebrating Women’s History by featuring female leaders here at Everside. Today, we’re shining the spotlight on Stache’ Smith, LPN and Director of Population Health. Stache’ has been a part of our Everside family for almost two years and brings a wealth of clinical, analytical, and health education experience. Learn more about Stache’, who inspires her, what Women’s History means to her, and more.


Is there a woman who has been especially inspiring to you?

My grandmother who is a breast cancer survivor and my mother who is a double lung transplant recipient. I was inspired to become a nurse because of them. Navigating the healthcare system can be overwhelming as a patient and I had to quickly learn how to assist them both along their journeys so that they could focus on healing and recovery. My work in population health is deeply rooted with the patient in mind and delivering the best patient experience through managing populations effectively.

“Firsts are necessary. Firsts allow for women to look back and see the women who have made huge advancements as history makers.”

What does Women’s History Month mean to you?

Women’s History Month means:

  • Taking the limits off what we as women can accomplish
  • Creating safe spaces for women to be heard, encouraged, and empowered
  • Mentorship and mentoring; Recognizing and cultivating the gifts and talents in other women
  • Demonstrating female leadership that embodies innovation, creativity, honesty and service to others      

There have been a number of exciting advancements for women over the last few years. What progress would you like to see in the next few years?

In the next few years, I would like to see even more women breaking through barriers and continuing to see firsts in healthcare and other industries that impact health outcomes. Opening doors for future generations to see they too can do the same, even if they are the first to do it. Ketanji Brown Jackson did just that in law when she was nominated as the first Black woman to sit on the Supreme Court. Firsts are necessary. Firsts allow for women to look back and see women who have made huge advancements as history makers. Firsts give us the inspiration to launch forward advancing as well. If it was done before, it can without a doubt be done again. Firsts are empowering and create momentum. Firsts empower women’s history in all of us this month and beyond.  

“Courage is the most important of all the virtues, because without courage you can’t practice any other virtue consistently.”

What advice do you have for the next generation of female leaders? 

Be Courageous. Maya Angelou said “Courage is the most important of all the virtues, because without courage you can’t practice any other virtue consistently. You can practice any virtue erratically, but nothing consistently without courage.”  Be brave enough to put yourself out there both professionally and personally. Practice courage and bravery every day. Courage is accepting the fear about a situation and doing the right thing anyway. Courage is not an absence of fear – instead it is overcoming it regardless.